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Search found 14 matches

by angsthasen
Tue Apr 26, 2022 10:30 am
Forum: Grammatica
Topic: [Help!] How to say "coconut sugar" in Latin?
Replies: 10
Views: 269
Canada

Re: [Help!] How to say "coconut sugar" in Latin?

Carla Hurt of Found in Antiquity , who cautions that she is not really an expert on historical linguistics and her opinion should thus be taken with a grain of salt, adds: I think the genus name cocos is a weird nominative formed from Portuguese "coco" with an -s attached (maybe a third de...
by angsthasen
Mon Apr 25, 2022 8:14 pm
Forum: Grammatica
Topic: [Help!] How to say "coconut sugar" in Latin?
Replies: 10
Views: 269
Canada

Re: [Help!] How to say "coconut sugar" in Latin?

Even in English, we will see alternate naming.
Are they green onions, scallions, or spring onions? It's it spun sugar, cotton candy, or fairy floss? Past a certain point, it's probably legitimate to lean on, "You'll figure out what I mean."

by angsthasen
Mon Apr 25, 2022 5:42 pm
Forum: Grammatica
Topic: [Help!] How to say "coconut sugar" in Latin?
Replies: 10
Views: 269
Canada

Re: [Help!] How to say "coconut sugar" in Latin?

Other people I've asked have suggested,

saccharum ex nuce cocō [familiāris]
(vel)
saccharum ex nuce praegrandī Indicā [pūblicus]

which seems to follow the coconut milk model from the lexicon.

by angsthasen
Mon Apr 25, 2022 8:09 am
Forum: Grammatica
Topic: [Help!] How to say "coconut sugar" in Latin?
Replies: 10
Views: 269
Canada

Re: [Help!] How to say "coconut sugar" in Latin?

Usually, I favour looking to the botanical name for new-world plants in Latin, but I'm not sure it's the best choice this time. cocōs in Latin is apparently the accusative plural of cocus, an alternative form of coquus ("cook"). I submit that most of the sugar available belongs to the cook...
by angsthasen
Tue Mar 22, 2022 3:26 am
Forum: Sententiarum explicatio
Topic: The sister is in the city, but the brother is at home.
Replies: 8
Views: 388
Canada

Re: The sister is in the city, but the brother is at home.

Well, if you lived in a small village and were on your way to the closest city, you would say "I am going to town" but you most likely wouldn't say "I am going to (the) city." No, I really would not say that. " to go to town " is an idiom meaning "to do something ...
by angsthasen
Mon Mar 14, 2022 3:13 am
Forum: Sententiarum explicatio
Topic: Are Those Three Women?
Replies: 1
Views: 178
Canada

Re: Are Those Three Women?

Latin drops articles. In English, there are three articles: "a", "an", and "the". When a translation needs them to make sense, we are expected to insert them. " Those " is not an article but a pronoun referring to specific things previously mentioned, known, o...
by angsthasen
Mon Mar 14, 2022 2:45 am
Forum: Sententiarum explicatio
Topic: Estne civitas?
Replies: 1
Views: 128
Canada

Re: Estne civitas?

Articles like "a" and "the" are dropped in Latin, and we may infer them in languages that require them. "This" is a pronoun referring to a specific thing just mentioned. I'm not yet strong with pronouns, but I believe that "Is this the state?" would be "E...
by angsthasen
Mon Mar 14, 2022 2:32 am
Forum: Sententiarum explicatio
Topic: The sister is in the city, but the brother is at home.
Replies: 8
Views: 388
Canada

Re: The sister is in the city, but the brother is at home.

To be in town has a slightly different meaning that to be in a town. If I were to say, "My sister is in town this week", people would understand me to mean that she lives elsewhere but is currently visiting my town, the town where I currently am. I would usually use this phrase when excusi...
by angsthasen
Mon Mar 07, 2022 10:30 pm
Forum: Grammatica
Topic: Fēminae iuvenēs, fēminae senēs
Replies: 13
Views: 516
Canada

Re: Fēminae iuvenēs, fēminae senēs

So, what do you think Duo should call that in English, since you say "young man" is incorrect translation for "iuvenis"? "young adult"? I don't think the "young" part is fixable, to be honest. It's an artifact of one culture drawing the boundaries around a wo...
by angsthasen
Mon Mar 07, 2022 9:06 am
Forum: Grammatica
Topic: Fēminae iuvenēs, fēminae senēs
Replies: 13
Views: 516
Canada

Re: Fēminae iuvenēs, fēminae senēs

In my opinion, "iuvenis" is more like a person who is capable of having a family and making a income to support the family or who is capable of fighting in war.

Yes, my impulse is to look at the age range of 'iuvenis' and think, 'this is a good age to conscript somebody'.

by angsthasen
Sat Mar 05, 2022 7:05 pm
Forum: Grammatica
Topic: Fēminae iuvenēs, fēminae senēs
Replies: 13
Views: 516
Canada

Re: Fēminae iuvenēs, fēminae senēs

It's probably depends how native English speakers would translate "The young man live alone." though, Honestly, a native English speaker would generally not think of most people between 20 and 40 years of age, a iuvenis , as a young man (or, more neutrally, a young adult) at all. The Unit...
by angsthasen
Sat Mar 05, 2022 6:38 pm
Forum: Grammatica
Topic: Fēminae iuvenēs, fēminae senēs
Replies: 13
Views: 516
Canada

Re: Fēminae iuvenēs, fēminae senēs

I wish I had a Latin grammar-checking application. My intuition is that Lydia est laeta et Lydia est agricola ergo Lydia est agricola laeta ; I believe that both "happy" and "farmer" modify Lydia. Google Translate (which is terrible for Latin) suggests "Agricola laetus est&q...
by angsthasen
Sat Mar 05, 2022 3:50 pm
Forum: Grammatica
Topic: Fēminae iuvenēs, fēminae senēs
Replies: 13
Views: 516
Canada

Re: Fēminae iuvenēs, fēminae senēs

I don't think this is a problem of the English term being more inclusive than we assume, though that's a good point. One of the exercises Duolingo offers is a forced-choice "Iuvenis [solus/sola] habitat" with "sola" being marked as the error.

IuvenisSolaNonHabitat.png
IuvenisSolaNonHabitat.png (119.49 KiB) Viewed 201 times
by angsthasen
Fri Mar 04, 2022 11:17 am
Forum: Grammatica
Topic: Fēminae iuvenēs, fēminae senēs
Replies: 13
Views: 516
Canada

Fēminae iuvenēs, fēminae senēs

I'm a little frustrated that the Duolingo Latin course doesn't recognise that women might exist who are either 20-40 years of age or over 40 years old. Lewis and Short's 1879 Latin Dictionary includes women in the substantive (using an adjective as a noun) for both iuvenis and senex ; what sense doe...

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